PETA wants Toy Story 4 director to remove character’s ‘symbol of domination’ over animals
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PETA wants Toy Story 4 director to remove character’s ‘symbol of domination’ over animals

ANIMAL rights organisation PETA has called on the director of Toy Story 4 to remove Bo Peep’s ‘cruel’ crook.

The charity has written a letter to director Josh Cooley asking him to remove the traditional hooked staff from the final animation.

After being absent from Toy Story 3, Bo Peep returns in the fourth instalment this summer and is expected to play a central role.

A new teaser released by Pixar this week also revealed Sheriff Woody’s love interest will boast a new look.

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The puffball dress and bonnet have been replaced with a jumpsuit and bow to reflect her ‘adventure-seeking free spirit’.

However the crook remains, and PETA aren’t happy.

'Outdated and cruel'

While they praised the franchise for paving the way for computer animation to replace live animals in film, PETA said the crook is ‘outdated and cruel’.

“You may not know that these ‘shepherd’s crooks,’ are used solely to hook a sheep’s neck and force these gentle animals to move,” wrote Lauren Thomasson, PETA Manager of Animals in Film and Television,

“That isn’t something that a progressive Bo Peep would countenance in 2019! A ‘badass’ Bo Peep would likely bop the shearers, not the sheep.”

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The charity says it has released 11 exposés with their affiliates of sheep being beaten, stomped on, mutilated and skinned alive for wool by careless shearers who are paid by volume.

It says strips of sheep’s skin are cut or torn off during shearing, while the most gaping wounds are stitched up without any pain relief.

“Surely you can agree that a symbol of domination over any animal is a thing of the past and not something that belongs in Toy Story 4,” the letter adds.

“We know that kind people everywhere would sing your praises – and Bo Peep’s, too – with this change.”

Pixar is yet to respond to the request. Toy Story 4 is set for release in Ireland, Britain and the US on June 21.