Eamonn Holmes celebrates 35 years on TV
Entertainment

Eamonn Holmes celebrates 35 years on TV

EAMONN Holmes started out broadcasting with UTV's Farming Ulster having abandoned his Saturday job at Primark.

Now, 35 years later, the Belfast man is one of the most sought-after personalities on British television.

Holmes will clock up the significant anniversary this week and celebrates it by being busier than ever.

The 55-year-old Irishman currently anchors Sky News Sunrise, and along with his wife Ruth Langsford presents This Morning for ITV every Friday and during the holidays.

Holmes also regularly presents shows on the BBC.

Advertisement

His rise through television has been steady. A no-nonsense style coupled with steady nerve and wry humour has proved a successful mix.

From UTV’s Farming Ulster Holmes graduated to sports reporting for UTV.

His reputation as a presenter steadily grew, and by 1982 he was anchor of UTV’s flagship programme Good Evening Ulster, succeeding Gloria Hunniford.

In 1986 Holmes joined up with the BBC in Manchester, proving popular from the outset.

Today he is one of the highest-earning broadcasters in Britain.

Eamonn’s career has had its low points — from having a gun held to his head in Belfast to the breakdown of his first marriage.

Holmes has also had his fair share of excruciating moments on live television.

Advertisement

David Blaine saying nothing for five minutes he describes as “one of those all-time telly bloopers where you didn't know if he was jet-lagged, diabetic or had too much to drink.”

Holmes eventually wound up the non-interview, shook Blaine’s hand, and said: “Different.”

The worst thing about being a celebrity, according to the Belfast man is “constantly being judged. Every Tom, Dick and Harry has an opinion.”

Nonetheless he seems very comfortable in his own skin and is very proud of his Irish roots. He is the host of the annual Irish Post Awards, taking place this year on October 23.

He recently told the Belfast Telegraph: "I don't know if I'm a good broadcaster, a good husband, a good father, but I do know for sure that I am a good Belfast man. First and foremost that's what I am. That's what makes me come alive.

"If I could broadcast Sky News from Belfast and be there all the time, I would be.”