Boris Johnson pledges to end 'unfair' prosecutions of Army veterans who served in Northern Ireland
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Boris Johnson pledges to end 'unfair' prosecutions of Army veterans who served in Northern Ireland

BORIS JOHNSON has vowed to end the “unfair” prosecutions of Army veterans who served in Northern Ireland, should he become Prime Minister.

The Tory leadership hopeful’s pledge came as part of an interview with The Sun at party headquarters and was echoed by fellow contender, Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt.

Johnson also gave his backing to a public campaign supporting UK soldiers who served in the region during the troubles.

"We need to end unfair trials of people who served their Queen and country when no new evidence has been produced, and when the accusations have already been exhaustively questioned in court,” he said.

"We must protect people against unfair prosecutions. And I will.

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"I totally support the principle of cross-government work to secure world-class care and support for veterans.

"There will be a minister with particular responsibilities for veterans in cabinet."

The promise comes as several Northern Ireland army veterans face charges.

They include Soldier F, who was charged in relation to the killings of two protesters in Londonderry in 1972 on what came to be known as Bloody Sunday.

The promise comes a week after the Northern Ireland Office published responses to its consultation, showing a "clear majority" of respondents felt an amnesty for Troubles-related matters would be inappropriate.

Former Northern Ireland Police Chief Constable Sir George Hamilton previously suggested official figures show investigations are not unfairly focused on the armed forces and police.

Some Conservative backbenchers, including many who served in Northern Ireland, are supportive of the idea of introducing a statute of limitations for former soldiers.

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