This incredible Irish Airbnb lets you stay in the top tower of an 800-year-old castle
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This incredible Irish Airbnb lets you stay in the top tower of an 800-year-old castle

IF YOU'RE interested in visiting Ireland for the history, this is about as close as you can get without literally going back in time.

Ireland is chock-full of quirky Airbnb's-- like these hobbit huts in Donegal and this treehouse in Cork-- but not many can boast real historical and archaeologic significance like this 800-year-old beauty.

(Airbnb)

Ballytarsna-Hacket Castle, in Cashel Co Tipperary is a 13th-century castle and fortress turned 15th century tower house turned 21st century Airbnb.

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The current owners lovingly restored the fortress to its original majesty while adding a few modernities-- but not Wi-Fi, so if you really want to get away from it all, this would be right up your street.

The tower where visiting guests will be housed was once used to protect the Hackett family from attacking forces, but is now an incredible mix of old and new, with the main room offering an ensuite bathroom and breathtaking views of the Tipperary countryside and even the nearby Rock of Cashel.

Rock of Cashel, Tipperary. Picture: Tourism Ireland

Within the modernised castle and tower is irrefutable evidence of how much the place is steeped in history-- underneath the Great Hall, where guests will be offered tea and scones on arrival, lies a deep dungeon, where one unfortunate prisoner etched the year '1536' into the wall.

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(Airbnb)

But the owners are eager to assure people that despite the ancient structure, Ballytarsna-Hackett Castle is warm and dry, and proclaim themselves to be "the best restored castle towerhouse in Ireland".

Feeling cynical? Why not find out for yourself?

Ballytarsna-Hackett Castle can be found on Airbnb (here) but the castle's popularity speaks for itself in terms of booking availability-- according to the website, the next time you can book a date to stay there is January 2021.

It's been 800 years though-- what's one more?