Aidan Turner’s new film 'The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Bigfoot' is getting great reviews
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Aidan Turner’s new film 'The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Bigfoot' is getting great reviews

THE FIRST trailer for Aidan Turner’s new film has arrived in the UK and Ireland after earning rave reviews.

The Clondalkin-born actor is best known for his star-making turn as TV heartthrob Poldark but that could be about to change with the release of The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Big Foot.

A unique blend of genres, the film’s slight bonkers plot centres on a legendary American war hero, both as a young man and in his twilight years, taking on two distinctly different adversaries.

While Turner plays the younger version of the central protagonist, A Star Is Born's Sam Elliott plays the older incarnation in a film further boosted by the presence of Office Space and Band of Brothers actor Ron Livingston.

The official synopsis for The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Big Foot reads:

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“Decades after serving in WWII and assassinating Adolf Hitler, Calvin Barr (Elliott / Turner) is enlisted as the only man for the job: to hunt down the fabled Bigfoot.

“Living a peaceful life in New England reflecting on his lost love, the war veteran is contacted by the FBI to lead the charge to capture the elusive beast that is carrying a deadly plague.”

A film of surprising depth and one hell of a title, The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Big Foot has already garnered positive reviews in the US.

It already carries a 75% rating on review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes.

The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Big Foot is a real movie - one more emotionally resonant and character-driven than that deceptively goony title suggests,” NPR’s Simon Abrams writes.

“A] strange and original and at times surprisingly lovely bit of folklore,” Richard Roeper of the Chicago Sun-Times reflects.

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“If audiences can get past their initial disappointment that the movie isn't all Hitler and Bigfoot murder, they may be able to enjoy his movie on its own terms,” Pete Vonder Haar of the Houston Press adds.

Film Inquiry’s Lee Jutton, meanwhile, surmises the film’s appeal thusly: “There's no denying it's the absurd enunciated in the title that drew me in, and even if The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot ended up not being what I expected, I still enjoyed it.”

The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Big Foot is out on DVD and digital this April 15th.