BBC Radio will play EDITED version of Fairytale of New York this Christmas due to song's 'offensive' lyrics
News

BBC Radio will play EDITED version of Fairytale of New York this Christmas due to song's 'offensive' lyrics

BBC RADIO 1 will only be featuring an edited version of Fairytale of New York this Christmas due to the song's 'controversial' lyrics.

The British broadcaster is set start playing the Christmas classic from the end of November right through to the festive season, but it won't be the version everyone loves and remembers.

Radio 1 will be playing a version of the song with the words 'f****t' and 'sl*t' edited out, though Radio 2 will still feature the classic version, because they deem that Radio 1 listeners are particularly sensitive to derogatory terms for gender and sexuality.

Over the last few years, the famous Pogues hit has come under scrutiny for usage of the slurs.

Campaigns have been set up to have the song changed and even removed from the airwaves, but it's simply proven too popular to suppress.

Advertisement

Kirsty MacColl, who provides the female vocals for the initial song alongside Shane MacGowan, recorded a different version of the song with the slurs swapped out for less offensive replacements, and this is the version Radio 1 will use.

Instead of the famous line: 'You sc*mbag, you maggot. You cheap, lousy f****t,' the final four words have been changed to: 'You're cheap and you're haggard'.

In a statement, the BBC said it made its decision because it was conscious that the traditionally younger audience who listen to Radio 1 might take offence to the original version of the song.

"We know the song is considered a Christmas classic and we will continue to play it this year, with our radio stations choosing different versions of the song most relevant for their audience," the broadcaster said.

Back in 2007, the song was censored by Radio 1, but the decision was swiftly reversed following public outcry.

Lovers of Fairytale of New York have previously hit out against those who slam the song due to its offensive slur, arguing that the characters MacColl and MacGowan are playing aren't meant to be admired or liked.

After all, the song is about an argument between an alcoholic and a heroin addict who have fallen out of love. Nobody should think that the characters presented are being positively promoted.

Advertisement