Interactive map reveals the potentially devastating impact of climate change on Ireland
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Interactive map reveals the potentially devastating impact of climate change on Ireland

A NEW interactive map has shone a light on the potentially devastating impact of climate change on the island of Ireland.

Climate Central has put the map together to show which parts of Ireland would disappear under sea level, if the Earth warmed by just 2C.

Parts of Dublin, Galway and Cork would be under water along with several other coastal areas, should sea levels continue to rise.

Scientists have warned that it is imperative that temperatures do not rise beyond 1.5C.

However, climate change activists are calling for immediate action, with research figures suggesting the planet could be heading for a 3C rise.

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This kind of increase would a devastating impact on the planet and would likely to lead to irreversible damage.

Extreme weather conditions could also become more frequent, impacting industries like tourism and agriculture as a result.

Ireland has already been brought to a near standstill by the infamous Beast from the East and Storm Emma, with the potential for even worse to come.

Ireland are to end exploration for non-renewable fossil fuels in the near future, becoming one of the first countries in the world to do so.

During a speech at the UN climate summit, Leo Varadkar confirmed that the Irish government had agreed to end exploration for oil and gas because "it is incompatible with a low carbon future."

As Ireland continues to lead the way in the global fight against climate change, the Taoiseach
declared that while the search for, and extraction of, oil will be shut down in the country, gas exploration will continue for some time as they take a more gradual shift to a carbon-free economy.

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Licensing for oil and gas exploration in the Atlantic "closed" area - which is 80% of Ireland's waters - will now end, although for the time being, they'll still be accepted in the Celtic and Irish Sea.