Chemotherapy sessions for children with cancer delayed due to lack of beds in Dublin hospital
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Chemotherapy sessions for children with cancer delayed due to lack of beds in Dublin hospital

CHILDREN IN Ireland who are suffering from cancer have had their chemotherapy sessions delayed due to a lack of beds in Crumlin Hospital.

Ireland's largest children's hospital have had to turn away young patients-- who were due to receive treatment for cancer-- five times this month alone, according to The Irish Times.

The hospital have cited a lack of beds due to a viral respiratory illness which is affecting a high number of children as the reason for postponing vital cancer treatment.

Of the five children who had their chemotherapy delayed this month, three were pushed back by one day and two were delayed for two days, a spokesperson for the hospital confirmed to The Irish Times, saying that Crumlin "sincerely regrets that on occasion deferment of planned admission occurs".

The spokesperson went on to say that "the decision to delay admission is not undertaken lightly" and that all affected children are now back on their planned schedule of treatement.

John Glynn, of childhood cancer charity The Gavin Glynn Foundation, has said that parents of sick children had also been told "sorry, we don't have any staff available to administer the chemo".

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Fianna Fáil health spokesman and TD Stephen Donnelly has called the situation "outrageous" and added:

"This causes cruel and needless stress for vulnerable families".