Watch: Kate Middleton and Prince William enjoy a pint of Guinness on St Patrick’s Day
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Watch: Kate Middleton and Prince William enjoy a pint of Guinness on St Patrick’s Day

THE DUKE and Duchess of Cambridge marked St. Patrick’s Day in appropriate style with a glass of Ireland’s favourite export, Guinness.

Prince William and Kate Middleton celebrated Ireland’s patron saint alongside the 1st Battalion Irish Guards at their Cavalry Barracks in Hounslow, England.

While William was happy to indulge in a pint of the black stuff and engage in conversation with the Irish guards in attendance, all eyes remained on his other half.

The Duchess made quite the impression too by wearing a bespoke emerald green coat from Alexander McQueen.

While the coat’s distinctive colour won plenty of plaudits, Middleton managed to go one better with an eye-catching golden shamrock pin.

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Her outfit was completed with a hat from Lock and Co along with Gianvito Rossi pumps for a day of celebration across much of the world.

Both Royals appeared only too happy to knock back a glass of the traditional Irish stout alongside the Irish guards, as they do every year, per tradition.

Middleton enjoyed a smaller cup of Guinness during the visit, which saw her reintroduced to the Irish Guard’s mascot, Domhanallan, the Irish wolfhound.

Their appearance and her decision to indulge in a spot of stout has also gone some way to silencing some of the previous tabloid rumours that the couple could be expecting a fourth child.

Mind you, a 2003 study at the University of Wisconsin previously claimed that just over a pint of Guinness could cut the risk of blood clots forming in the arteries and therefore your chances of a heart attack.

The research showed alternatives such as lager did not have the same effect.

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It’s thought that flavonoids, a type of plant-based antioxidant found in darker drinks like stout, are responsible for this.

However, it’s worth remembering that drinking lots of alcohol can actually cause your cholesterol to rise.