Limerick pub vows to continue banning unvaccinated customers after 'Freedom Day'
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Limerick pub vows to continue banning unvaccinated customers after 'Freedom Day'

A PUB-OWNER in Co. Limerick has pledged to continue refusing customers who haven't been vaccinated against Covid-19 beyond October 22.

Current rules state that in order to access indoor dining areas, customers must be fully vaccinated and need to provide proof of vaccination to get inside.

These rules are however set to be dropped later this month on what has been dubbed Ireland's 'Freedom Day'.

Despite this, GearĂłid Whelan, who owns Whelans Bar on Maiden Street in Newcastle West, took to social media insisting that he won't be changing any rules, and will only let customers in if they have a legitimate vaccine certificate.

"We at Whelans Bar will be keeping up the vaccine only going forward, so for all ye anti-vax f***s that think ye are getting in on the 22nd of October go and f**k yourselves," he wrote in a tweet.

"And I know my language isn't appropriate but it's the only language them idiots seem to understand, so for all the normal followers I have just ignore it, the anti-vax crowd can ... CLOWNS," he said before adding a middle-finger and a clown emoji.

The response Gearoid received was far from positive. Many Twitter users criticised him for abusing those who have chosen not to get vaccinated, and for mistaking vaccine hesitancy for being anti-vaxx.

"Being cautious regarding this is not being anti-vax," one user said.

"I can guarantee you when nobody is coming in the door in November December and January you will change your tune," another Twitter user wrote.

On October 22, Ireland will be dropping the vast majority of public health measures regarding Covid-19 in what is the country's first major step back to normality.

Physical distancing will be scrapped, as will vaccine certificates and limits on the number of people allowed to attend events.

Face masks will remain a requirement, but only in shops and on public transport for now.