'Vaccine passports' may become mandatory for long-haul flights with passengers required to provide proof of anti-Covid jab
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'Vaccine passports' may become mandatory for long-haul flights with passengers required to provide proof of anti-Covid jab

PASSENGERS may be required to prove they have had a Covid-19 vaccine before flying, going forward.

Special 'vaccination passports' could be introduced so that airlines can be sure that none of their passengers are spreading coronavirus.

It would be an official certification that someone has been vaccinated for Covid-19, and could be accessed online, so the passenger wouldn't necessarily need to carry it around like their original passport.

The initiative is being considered by Australian airline Qantas, but could well be rolled out for all major international airlines if it's deemed successful.

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Qantas are considering implementing a vaccine passport system whereby only passengers with proof of a coronavirus vaccination may board their flight

"We are looking at changing the terms and conditions to say for international travellers that we will ask people to have the vaccination before they get on the aircraft," said Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce.

"What we are looking at is how you can have a vaccination passport, an electric version of it, that certifies what the vaccine is, and if it is acceptable to the country you are travelling to."

It's understood the initiative would be implemented on long-haul flights only. So domestic flights and short trips wouldn't require a vaccination passport.

Anyone flying from Ireland to the UK would likely be exempt from the measure, but those flying from Ireland to US may have to provide proof of their vaccinations.

Australia has had some of the strictest border restrictions throughout the pandemic, so it's no surprise that an Australian company should come up with such a strict measure, but if it reduced the risk of spreading Covid around the world then who'd be against it?

"For international visitors coming out and people leaving [Australia], we think that's a necessity," Joyce added.

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