Edward Colston statue in Bristol replaced by sculpture of Black Lives Matter protester
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Edward Colston statue in Bristol replaced by sculpture of Black Lives Matter protester

A STATUE of a Black Lives Matter protester has been erected on the plinth where a statue of former slaver Edward Colston used to stand in Bristol.

The sculpture, entitled A Surge of Power (Jen Reid), was put up shortly before 5am on Tuesday by artist Marc Quinn and a team of activists - without prior knowledge of Bristol City council.

It isn't know whether the statue will be allowed to remain there or not.

Mayor Marvin Rees had previously stated that any decision on how the plinth should be used would be decided democratically through proper consultation.

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BRISTOL, ENGLAND - JULY 15: Black Lives Matter protestor Jen Reid poses for a photograph in front of a sculpture of herself, by local artist Marc Quinn, on the plinth where the Edward Colston statue used to stand on July 15, 2020 in Bristol, England. A statue of slave trader Edward Colston was pulled down and thrown into Bristol Harbour during Black Lives Matter protests sparked by the death of an African American man, George Floyd.

Once the sculpture was erected, the subject of the piece - Mrs Reid - stood in front of it with her fist in the air for a photo opportunity.

"It's just incredible," she told the Guardian.

"This is going to continue the conversation. I can't see it coming down in a hurry."

Back in June, a number of Black Lives Matter protesters used ropes to pull down the Colston statue before tossing it into the harbour.

BRISTOL, ENGLAND - JULY 15: A new sculpture, by local artist Marc Quinn, of Black Lives Matter protestor Jen Reid stands on the plinth where the Edward Colston statue used to stand on July 15, 2020 in Bristol, England. A statue of slave trader Edward Colston was pulled down and thrown into Bristol Harbour during Black Lives Matter protests sparked by the death of an African American man, George Floyd.
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The statue was removed from the water four days' later and is to be displayed in a museum.

Protesters took issue with the statue, which was erected in 1895, due to Colston's links to the transatlantic slave trade.

Some however were uncomfortable with the idea that the statue was removed without due democratic process, with one protester being arrested by police for vandalism earlier this month.