Teen who threw six-year-old boy from Tate Modern balcony jailed for 15 years
News

Teen who threw six-year-old boy from Tate Modern balcony jailed for 15 years

THE TEENAGER who threw a six-year-old French boy off a 10th-floor viewing platform at London's Tate Modern art gallery last August has been jailed for a minimum of 15 years.

18-year-old Jonty Bravery, who was 17 at the time of the incident, was sentenced at the Old Bailey on Thursday after admitting he intended to kill the child.

It's understood that Bravery has been diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorder as well as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD).

The victim, who was visiting London from France with his family, landed on the fifth-floor balcony, some 100ft (30m) below.

He miraculously survived but broke his spine, legs and arms in the fall, and is still recovering in hospital.

Advertisement

During sentencing, Mrs Justice McGowan told Bravery: "That little boy has suffered permanent and life-changing injury.

 

Metropolitan police press officer Melanie Pressley (C) gives a statement outside the Old Bailey on behalf of the family of the victim, in London on June 26, 2020, after a troubled British teenager who threw the six-year-old French boy off a viewing platform at London's Tate Modern art gallery last year was jailed for life. - Judge Maura McGowan told Jonty Bravery, 18, he would spend at least 15 years in custody for attempting to murder the boy in front of horrified crowds on August 4 last year. (Photo by Tolga Akmen / AFP) (Photo by TOLGA AKMEN/AFP via Getty Images)

"You went to the viewing platform, looked around and spotted the victim and his family and went to the boy and threw him over the railing.

"The fear he must have experienced and the horror his parents felt are beyond imagination.

"What you did on the day of this offence proves you are a grave danger to the public. You planned this and appeared to revel in the notoriety."

Advertisement

In a victim impact statement taken in February, the victim's parents said: "Words cannot express the horror and fear [Bravery's] actions have brought upon us.

"Our son, you now, six months on, is wondering why he's in hospital.

"How can he not see in every stranger a potential 'villain' who could cause him immense pain and suffering?"

It's understood that neither the family of the victim, nor of Bravery, were present in court for the sentencing.